Tracking Return on Investment – Jango Music?

Return on Investment
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Today we talk about breaking down the price of airplay, and how to track your Return on investment (ROI). I got a notice from CDBaby about a service called Jango. According to their website they have 7 million listeners. It’s an internet radio station that allows you to create your own stations. They compare themselves to pandora. The biggest difference between Jango and Pandora for me is I’ve heard of Pandora, and I’ve never heard of Jango. Have You? (Use the poll below).

I went over and took a peek, and the I also went and tried to find an “Average” Indie artist. Well the guy I found (that came on after Ted Nugent) turned out to be a guy who has played with Kip Winger, and worked with Olivia Newton-John, Paul Abdul, etc. He had five whole fans of his music. I did find it very useful that you can email people who become fans of your music (cause they say the money is in the list for a reason). So I put some of their pricing into an Excel Spreadsheet (you can learn Excel at lynda.com along with zillion other titles for only $25) and here is what I came up with.

They state that you get 30-50 fans per 1000 plays. I took the average (40) and used that for my calculations. If you get 40 fans per 1000 plays, you would get 10 fans for 250 plays and 160 if you got 4000 plays. This means you will pay anywhere from $1 a fan (250 plays) to .63 a fan (4000 plays).

The site does allow you to link to your website. You might want to use a link tracking tool like PrettyLinks (for wordpress – learn how to build your website with this free software) to see how many people click-through on your Jango web page back to your band’s website (you do have a website right?). The plugin is free, and there is a premium version but that’s not required to just track clicks.

If you are looking for a free way to get your music in front of people, try uploading your music to Music Alley, and then locating music podcasters that play your style of music. Send a personal email to the host (not form letters) and mention something that proves you listen to the show. If you’re music fits their genre, I would almost guarantee you that they will play your music. I would send them a link to your music (not the file – that ties up their email inbox), and mention that you are on Music Alley. You can read this free chapter of my book here.

Special thanks to Bryan from Jestamusic.com we play the song “Bitchy” from his album “Previously

Leave A Reply (2 comments so far)


  1. Brian Hartzog
    2 years ago

    Hi Dave,

    Nice post! I think you are approaching Jango in a great way–looking at it as paid advertising. I appreciate the thought you put into this post.

    I would suggest that with Jango you can actually email your fans…and those who listen to your music but haven’t “fanned” you yet. In fact, if you’re tricky, you can email them as they are listening to your music. When you email them, you can give them a link to your squeeze page on your blog. My Jango squeeze page has really high conversion rate–like when I first did this it was over 45%…I just checked and it’s down to 11.5%…I think mostly because I haven’t done this in a while and there are other folks finding this page and watering down the conversion rate. (My tracking is not very precise yet.)

    My best guess is that the conversion is so high because the people have already heard my music, liked it enough to fan me, and have gotten a personal email from me.

    I agree that the podcast promotion is a great tool as well (and free!)…but I think Jango is an interesting experiment. Unlike podcast promotion, you actually can get feedback from your listeners…plus, you have the ability to contact people who like your music. Which you can’t do with podcast listeners.

    I’m working on getting all my analytics/tracking/testing in decent shape…and then I may do a test do see if using Jango this way is profitable .Currently, I only have rough stats on the email signups…not purchases. If your numbers hold true, it’d be worthwhile to know how much a .63 fan is worth to me…i.e. how much music of mine they buy…

    I actually put together a Jango post on my personal blog a few months ago:

    http://brianhartzog.com/blog/indie-music/indie-music-marketing/jango-review-what-indie-artists-needed-a-long-time-ago/

    I love the podcast.

    Keep jammin!
    Brian
    http://www.brianhartzog.net
    http://www.theinternetmusician.com
    (My music marketing podcast.)


  2. DanSpec
    2 years ago

    Howdy Dave,

    I paid for Jango for a couple of months. It was kinda cool. You get a list of fans that you can send emails to and promote your music. As for the value, we I never sold an album from the money spent, but the comments and seeing that people were becoming my fan was great for my moral. So.. Its worth giving a try in my experience, but I dunno about making a bunch of money with it.

    Here are my stats.. I forgot how many months, or how much money I spent but this is what I got out of it.

    Your all time activity: 3917 plays (3650 paid), 119 total likes, 96 fans, 199 views

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